To Get Where You’re Going, It Helps To Know Where You Come From

My grandma Sarah Scott (left) Me, Felecia Scott (Right)

I recently learned this. As most African-Americans, we don’t know or have any documents detailing our family history. It wasn’t until much later that I realized that I too have a history and share it with the world every day. I grew up making soaps, body oils and ointments with my grandmother. We made them from recipes passed down from her grandmother, Mamie who was African-American Chickasaw Indian. I enjoyed listening to the stories my grandmother, Sarah Scott telling me how she made these very same recipes with my great, great-grandmother Mamie.

Growing up there was always fragrance in our house. My grandmother would be canning  fruit, making a jam and drying herbs. We had a garden. I’d be right beside my grandmother picking tomatoes while occasionally pulling up the roots of the mint and sage leaves, to my grandmother’s frustration. She never yelled at me for it. I guess she knew I was having so much fun. I always wondered why, I loved being in the garden. Why I was fascinated with every flowers and herbs while dabbling with fragrances (again to my grandmother’s frustration because I would be mixing up her perfumes).

Growing up there was always fragrance in our house. My grandmother would be canning  fruit, making a jam and drying herbs. We had a garden. I’d be right beside my grandmother picking tomatoes while occasionally pulling up a the roots of the mint and sage leaves, to my grandmother’s frustration. She never yelled at me for it. I guess she knew I was having so much fun. I always wondered why, I loved being in the garden. Why I was fascinated with every flowers and herbs while dabbling with fragrances (again to my grandmother’s frustration because I would be mixing up her perfumes).

Not long ago my grandmother told me some more amazing history I didn’t know and answered a lot of questions I had within myself. To know my great, great grandmother Mamie was a healing woman. One of her sisters was a medicine woman.  I’m embarrassed and ashamed to admit that I was hesitant to let people know that my recipes, were from my African-American Chickasaw Indian ancestry. I didn’t know what the reaction would be. I imagined the worst. Once I let go of the fear, self doubt and hating to some extent, a beautiful world opened up to me. It set me free to express how and what I do passionately.

I don’t have any pictures of my great, great grandmother and sisters but I feel them with me. Every time I create a  new recipe, I imagine them as young girls, giggling and arguing about what to put in a soap or ointment. It makes me smile because I did the very same thing with my grandmother. I understand why I love doing what I do. Researching the benefits of various herbs, flowers and designing infused oils from that is a wonderful blessing. I’m no doctor but what I make is can offer comfort, helping and be very therapeutic to people.

Although I don’t have official documents that date back to 1700 or a lineage that shows my ancestors were on the Mayflower but to me what I have is priceless. My grandmother has a few recipes written down but most are from her memories and recollections. They are just as important as any document.

When I make my company’s Wild Beauty’s body oils, I smile thinking my great, great, grandmother made this too. I feel connected to her. Through these recipes and letting the world know wonderful and amazing women lived and passed down something very precious to the world. I’m honored to be able to share it.

Felecia Scott

Founder/Wild Beauty

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4 thoughts on “To Get Where You’re Going, It Helps To Know Where You Come From

  1. Wow!! I just read your story and I enjoyed it very much.I reall do value our friendship and I hope it last forever.Thanks
    Your best friend/Jimmy Diggs Pasadena,Ca

  2. Felecia, be proud of your heritage. Be proud of the women in your family. They have weathered storms we can’t conceive of and have produced thoughtful, caring individuals such as yourself.

    • Thank you, Linda. It’s not easy for me to discuss these moments of feeling inferior, self hate and doubt but there comes a time when you have to say, enough is enough. I have a wonderful gift and history that’s been passed to me. I shouldn’t hide it. Thank you for your kind words.

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